Next 

 

David Garnett
Aspects of Love

London: Penguin edition, 1959, reprinted 1978 (left)
&
New York: Harcourt Brace, 1956 (right)


In the Harcourt Brace edition, the cover emphasizes the French setting and Rose, who is part of the love triangle.  The Penguin edition is both more explicit and subtle, the triangular ashtray and the lipstick-stained cigarette suggesting the triangular relationship within. 

 

 


Sylvia Townsend Warner
The Cat’s Cradle Book

New York: Viking Press, 1940 (left)
&
London: Chatto & Windus, 1960
(right)  
 
Warner’s Cats Cradle Book was published in America 20 years before the English edition due to wartime paper shortages in Britain.  The artistic representation of cats is dramatically different in the English edition; or perhaps cats are thought of differently in America than in England.  The cat on the cover of the English edition is a comfortably domestic creature which gives no hint of the acerbity  of the stories within. The American edition emphasizes a more predatory atmosphere.

 


David Garnett
Go She Must!

London: Chatto & Windus, 1927 (left)
&
New York: Garden City, no date
(right)  
 
Garnett’s novel tells the story of Anne Dunnock, daughter of a widowed Rector. The American dustjacket shows her leaving her dull village. It also translates Rector to “Preacher,” a term which would have been more accessible to American audiences. It might also have been more suggestive, as in “preacher’s daughter.” 

 

 


Frances Partridge
Memories

London: Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1981 (left)
&
Boston and New York: Little Brown and Co., 1981 (right)  

 
The dust jacket design of the English edition is by Angelica Garnett, daughter of Vanessa Bell (the sister of Virginia Woolf).  Frances Partridge was one of the last survivors of the Bloomsbury Group.  She was also the sister of Ray Garnett, David Garnett’s illustrator and first wife.  Notice the subtle title change between the English and American editions.  Whereas the name Frances Partridge was enough for British readers, Americans apparently needed “Love in Bloomsbury” appended to the title in order to understand the subject matter.