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Rhys Davies
The Withered Root

London: Robert Holden & Co., 1927 (left)  
&
New York: Henry Holt, 1928
(right)  


The artist for the American dust jacket was clearly influenced by the English, though he chooses to portray the temptress in a perhaps more alluring but modest manner.

 


David Garnett
 Aspects of Love

Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1959
&
Dell Paperback D193, date unknown

 
The Penguin edition is designed in the publisher’s traditional conservative format, with the addition of British blurbs that identify the locale and praise the style. The cover illustration of the Dell edition is by Reynold Ruffins and capitalizes fully on the title with a bedroom scene that also draws on iconographic conventions for representing the French setting: balcony and 'French' shutters. The back cover offers a suggestive summary: "The scene is France. The theme is love. The variations are infinite."

 

 


George Bernard Shaw
Cashel Byron's Profession

London: Constable & Co., 1924
&

The Admirable Bashville

New York: Brentano’s, 1909

 
The Constable edition is a reissue of the fourth of Shaw's "novels of my nonage," and his only
boxing novel, first published in 1885.  The pictorial dust jacket by A. C. Smith captures the moment when Lydia Carew first encounters the handsome prize-fighter and his trainer in the woods near Warren Lodge. The Admirable Bashville is a half-whimsical blank-verse version of the novel rushed into print to ward off piracy after an American produced a four-act dramatization in New York. Bashville was the heroine’s footman, a rival to Cashel Byron and an expert Cornish wrestler.

 

 


Sylvia Townsend Warner
The Espalier

London: Chatto & Windus, 1925
&
New York: Lincoln Mac Veagh, The Dial Press, 1925

 
The severely simple dust jacket by Charles Prentice declines to explain the title or to identify the genre as poetry.  To her publisher, Sylvia Townsend Warner explained her title thus: "It seems to me expressive-a naturally rather straggling plant such as the mind is . . .
deprived and formalized into producing fruit."  The dust jacket text of the American edition ensures that readers know they are getting "an outstanding book of poetry."  The references to her fiction are used as an additional enticement.